Salmon Cakes with Roasted Pepper Tarragon Remoulade

16 Sep

This recipe is great for using leftover cooked salmon, or using canned salmon. Don’t use fresh salmon especially for this recipe; it wouldn’t make sense to ruin a beautiful piece of salmon this way. Remoulade sauce is French in origin and is a condiment similar to mayonnaise. Several cuisines have different variations on the sauce. According to Wikipedia, Remoulade can contain just mayonnaise, chopped herbs, anchovies and pickles; to a sauce similar to Thousand Island dressing. This Remoulade is closer to the latter, but not as sweet. It is the perfect accompaniment to these savory cakes.

Serve them as an entrée, or serve one on a bun with lettuce and tomato for lunch. Either way, it is a quick and easy way to prepare a fresh meal. As for the canned salmon, you can use the less expensive pink salmon ($1.99-2.50 for a 14.75 oz. can), to sockeye salmon ($4.50-5.25 for the same size can).

Serves two to four persons

You will need

Bowls for mixing Remoulade and cakes (1 large 4 qt. and 1 small 2 qt.)

Cutting board

Mixing spoons

Measuring spoons

Liquid measuring cups

Dry measuring cups

Baking sheet for baking, or

Sauté pan for sautéing w/cover

Paper Towels

Roasted pepper Tarragon Remoulade

1/2 cup mayonnaise

1 shallot, finely minced

¼ cup pimentos, finely diced

1 tsp. cider vinegar

1 ½ Tbl. Chopped fresh tarragon, OR 2 tsp. dried tarragon

½ tsp. cracked black pepper

¼ tsp. sea salt

Combine all ingredients in bowl and stir gently until mixed thoroughly. Chill in refrigerator until ready to use.

Salmon Cakes

14 oz. can of salmon, cleaned of bones and skin

½ cup unseasoned bread crumbs or cracker meal

1 Tbl. Dried parsley or 2 Tbl. chopped fresh parsley

¾ cup mayonnaise

1 Tbl. brown mustard or Dijon mustard

1 large egg

1 tsp. lemon juice

¼ tsp. Old Bay seasoning or Creole seasoning*

1/3 cup canola oil (sautéing), OR Pan coating (baking)

Whisk together mayonnaise, egg, mustard, lemon juice and Old Bay or Creole Seasoning in small bowl; set aside. In separate large bowl, place salmon in bowl and break up into small pieces. Add bread crumbs and parsley to salmon, mix well. Add I/2 of mayonnaise mixture to salmon and fold in gently. Fold ¼ of leftover mayonnaise mixture to salmon mix. Salmon mixture should be slightly wet. Only add the rest of mayonnaise mixture to salmon if cakes are still dry. Discard any leftover dressing.

Shape into 4 patties, place patties on a plate and refrigerate for 15 to 20 minutes so that cakes can firm up.

Directions for sautéing( NOTICE!! OIL CAN SPLATTER; MAKE SURE PAN IS DRY AND YOU HAVE THE APPROPRIATE COVER FOR THE PAN YOU ARE USING. COVER MUST FIT PAN)


Heat the canola oil over medium heat on sauté pan. Place patties; one at a time, in pan. Cover and turn heat to medium-low. Cook the salmon cakes for 3-4 minutes on one side or until brown; turn cakes and cover. Cook other side of cakes and brown. Put browned caked on paper towels to drain off excess oil.

Directions for baking: Preheat oven to 425. Spray baking sheet with cooking spray. Place cakes on cooking sheet, and spray each cake with a short burst of the cooking spray. Bake on center rack in oven for 10-15 minutes, or until brown.

**Old Bay is an east-coast seafood seasoning that is used to steam Blue Crabs and shrimp, as well as a seasoning for fried chicken.  It may not be available in your market, but Creole Sesoning is close enough and is used to make Creole and  Cajun staples such as etouffe,  Jambalaya and gumbo. It is suitable for utilization in this recipe.

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One Response to “Salmon Cakes with Roasted Pepper Tarragon Remoulade”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Best recipes from around the web » Salmon Cakes with Roasted Pepper Tarragon Remoulade - September 17, 2008

    […] culinarychick wrote a fantastic post today on “Salmon Cakes with Roasted Pepper Tarragon Remoulade”Here’s ONLY a quick extractThis recipe is great for using leftover cooked salmon, or using canned salmon. Don’t use fresh salmon especially for this recipe; it wouldn’t make sense to ruin a beautiful piece of salmon this way. Remoulade sauce is French in origin … […]

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